About Us

About the University of Pennsylvania

Home to the Graduate School of Education, the University of Pennsylvania is the oldest university in the United States, a member of the Ivy League, and one of the world's finest institutions of higher learning. The university consistently ranks among the top ten in the nation in the U.S. News & World Report survey, while Penn GSE is rated among the leading graduate schools of education. In addition to undergraduate programs, 12 graduate and professional schools are located on Penn's 262-acre campus in West Philadelphia. Penn's rich tradition of scholarship and its eminent faculty, as well as the school's vast libraries, laboratories, and other academic resources, attract students of diverse interest and backgrounds from all over the nation and across the globe.  


About Penn GSE

The University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education (Penn GSE) is one of three Ivy League graduate schools of education. Its alumni include pathfinding teachers, heads of school boards, presidents of colleges, leading advocates for public education, scholars, school counselors, CLOs, and heads of government agencies. A pioneer in instructional theory, assessment, psychology of learning, and classroom training, Penn GSE is distinguished by its "inquiry" approach, which motivates and prepares students to think like educators and scholar practitioners.

 

About Program History

The PennCLO Executive Doctoral Program was established at the University of Pennsylvania in 2006, under the leadership of its Graduate School of Education (Penn GSE), with support from business leaders and faculty from across Penn, including Penn’s Business School (the Wharton School). The PennCLO Program was the first of its kind—it was, and remains, uniquely multi-disciplinary and designed for professionals who are passionate about creating value at the intersection of learning, leadership, business, and organizational behavior. From its inception, PennCLO has drawn on Penn’s rich history of innovation, research, and practical application going back to Benjamin Franklin, the University’s founder.